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Plymouth City 101

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With a rich maritime history, sweeping ocean views and a growing food scene, Plymouth sure packs a punch. Situated on England’s South West coast, Devon’s largest city has served as a launchpad for history-making pioneers, swashbuckling pirates and famous explorers such as Sir Francis Drake – and is home to the biggest naval base in Western Europe.

Plymouth is a resilient city. Having suffered severe damage during the Second World War, the city centre was completely rebuilt and is now one of the finest examples of post-war architecture in the UK. Several new multimillion pound regeneration projects are now underway, set to transform the city centre once again for the 21st century.

Plymouth, England (Credit: Visit Plymouth) 

Historic sites in Plymouth

On 16 September 1620 the Mayflower Pilgrims – many of whom were fleeing religious persecution – set sail from Plymouth to the New World, where they established Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts. Numerous landmarks commemorate their epic journey, most notably the Mayflower Steps, which were built close to the site where the Pilgrims boarded the ship. 

Mayflower Steps Plymouth England

Credit: Visit Plymouth, Andy Fox

Prior to their departure, many of the Pilgrims lodged at what is now known as Island House, where today visitors can find a complete list of the Mayflower’s 102 passengers; learn more at the Mayflower Museum through interactive displays and exhibitions. 

Plymouth’s other historic buildings include The Elizabethan House (currently under restoration, reopening in 2020), which provides insight into what living quarters were like in Drake’s day; Prysten House (which houses The Greedy Goose Restaurant), where visitors can find a memorial to American sailors killed in the War of 1812; Plymouth Synagogue, the oldest Ashkenazi Synagogue in the English speaking world; and the Royal Citadel, a dramatic 17th century fortress that was once England’s most important defence and which is still in use by the British Army today.

Due to open in 2020, The Box will bring Plymouth’s naval history and ancestral archives to life in its permanent galleries and ever-changing exhibitions, the first of which, titled ‘Legend and Legacy’, will mark the Mayflower anniversary. Many commemorations and events are happening in 2020 to mark 400 years since the ship’s voyage.

Things to do in Plymouth

Had your fill of history? The National Marine Aquarium - the UK’s largest - will enthrall wildlife lovers, while souvenir hunters will find plenty of independent shops and galleries to explore along the Barbican’s Southside Street. 

National Marine Aquarium Plymouth England

Credit: The National Marine Aquarium, Plymouth

The grassy slopes of Plymouth Hoe offer unbeatable views across Plymouth Sound, as well as opportunities to climb former lighthouse Smeaton’s Tower, or take a dip at Tinside Lido – a semi-circular, art deco pool open in the summer months. Water babies might also like to SUP (stand-up paddle board), sail or kayak around the bay, or join a boat trip. 

Smeaton's Tower, Plymouth

Smeaton's Tower, Plymouth (Credit: Trevor Burrows)

Tinside Lido swimming pool

Tinside Lido swimming pool at sunset (Credit: Andy Fox)

If dry land is more your style, follow the family-friendly Plym Valley Cycle Path, an off-road route that takes cyclists from the city to the edge of Dartmoor National Park. Plymouth also serves as a great base from which to explore the beaches of Devon and neighbouring county Cornwall.

Best Restaurants in Plymouth

Plymouth is home to the oldest working gin distillery in England. Established on the site of an ancient monastery in 1793, today’s visitors can tour Plymouth Gin Distillery (where the Mayflower Pilgrims are said to have spent their last night) and enjoy a tipple in the adjoining Refectory Cocktail Bar. 

Sustainable seafood is king in this coastal city. Sample some of the best at New England-style restaurant Rock Fish; The Boathouse Cafe; and Platters, the oldest seafood restaurant in Plymouth – or opt for a classic British takeaway at the award-winning Harbourside fish and chip shop. Want more? See the catch come in at Plymouth Fisheries, or plan your visit around the annual Plymouth Seafood Festival in September.

Royal William Yard – Formerly the major victualling depot for the Royal Navy. Now a beautiful leisure area with shops, boat trips, restaurants and accommodation

101 Must-Do’ ways to live your regional connection.

Our 101 team have been working with local tourism, business, community and Council initiatives to bring you some of the best ways for you to live your connection to Plymouth.

Comments

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Adams

John Adams the immigrant from Wales arrived in Maryland around 1700 thence to Virginia. Son and grandson Sylvester fought in the Revolutionary War. Family in Tennessee around 1820 thence to Mississippi and Texas.
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Thomas L. Adams

Is there still a castle in Ireland that the Adams Family ownes. Would like to find all my family heritage and all the
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Liam adams

I'm the last living male Adams living in Wales, UK. Trying to find my roots an where my bloodline come from?. Anyone help me?. Email.
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Adams

Adams from the USA Presidents' ancestry. My Adams came to Liverpool from Glenavy, Antrim in the 1870s. My DNA match results contain many Adams Presidents' line. I am in touch with the descendant of the cousin of my Glenavy/Lisburn Adams. He has the same DNA results. How are we connected to this Presidents' family?? Thank you.
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Mike Adams

We are from ADAMS of Aghacarnan, Magheragall and neighbouring Ballynacoy, Glenavy, County Antrim, Ireland... Methodists, buried in the Tullyrusk Graveyard at Dundrod, Crumlin. We have always presumed our Adams were of Scottish Plantation origin. However, after many decades research, we are surprised to find a large number of our Adams share DNA with the US Presidential Adams family. This family originates from Henry Adams 1583-1646 of Barton St David, Somerset, England and neighbouring Gloucestershire, who we believe fled religious persecution in 1638 for Massachusetts USA. If this DNA connection is correct and given migration was one direction towards America, this would suggest other close members of Henry Adams’ family must have left Somerset for Northern Ireland, perhaps via Scotland. Surprisingly, with everyone focusing in the great Irish diaspora, there appears little on the web regarding intra-UK family migration that brought many English and Scots to Northern Ireland’s shores in the first place. Consequently, we are interested in making contact with other genealogy enthusiasts, who might have evidence of Somerset Adams ending up in County Antrim, Ireland?
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) According to research, the Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France. It is a very old name which appears in the 5th century Roman inscriptions as Dumnovellaunos in Brittany meaning “Deep Valour” equivalent to Irish Domhnaill. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Adams story begins in pre-history Ireland then moves to Wales where the family can be traced back to their Welsh tribe Cydifor Fawr. Many of his kin will then move to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Adams name has a long history in Wales, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Adams story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Adams surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland.
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Anthony Barrett

The Adams name has a long history in Wales, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Adams story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Adams surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland. The Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France according to research from the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique. It is a very old name which appears in the 5th century Roman inscription
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Anthony Barrett

The Adams name has a long history in Wales, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Adams story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Adams surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland. The Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France according to research from the Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique. It is a very old name which appears in the 5th century Roman inscription
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Reed

James Reed , my 6th great grandfather arrived in North America around 1728 , he had seven sons and two son-n-laws who a all fought for the colony’s during the revolutionary war. One of his sons, my 5th great grandfather John Lovett Reed also was fairly well known . During the war between the states in the US , my great great grandfather David Reed rode with Nathan Bedford Forrest in the 14th Tennessee cavalry CSA .
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Reed

Captain Reed 1800s
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bennett

Roberta kavalchuk, I am interested in Ellen (Eleanor) Bennett who was born 1826 I believe in Clare county. I do not know her parents names. She came to Canada in 1850 and married Henry Emes in 1851 in North Gwillimbury York County ontario. Interested in finding anyone who may have connection with her.
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Tony Fawcett

I am interested in Sarah Bennett born about 1831 in Nenagh, Tipperary to parents John Bennett a farmer and Mary Anne Gleeson. Sarah left the Tipperary town workhouse as an "orphan girl" in 1849 aged 17 under the name Sarah Hickey and settled in Victoria, Australia. Love to hear from anyone who could shed some light on her Bennett beginnings.
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Cole

Has anybody been using this chat recently? Anyways, I'm looking for Robert from Cork or Tip- don't know which cause all we have are his shillelagh, his death certificate, and his wife's stuff. We visited her family in Ireland and even they don't know squat about Rob.
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Andy cole

Hi all,my grandfather's family where from Co cavan.he moved to meath and married my grandmother where they later lived in Tullyallen co Louth.look forward to hearing from other Cole clan members
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arlene

looking for christopher robert tucker from dublin married in 1913 in england his father patrick tucker or thomas
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STEPHENS

ames Stephens (Irish: Séamus Mac Stiofáin; 26 January 1825 – 29 March 1901) was an Irish Republican, and the founding member of an originally unnamed revolutionary organisation in Dublin. This organisation, founded on 17 March 1858, was later to become known as the Irish Republican Brotherhood (I.R.B). Nationality: Irish Occupation: Civil engineer, teacher, translator, newspaper publisher Resting place: Glasnevin Cemetery Please note all of his family including his brother Walter Stephens were Railway Engineers. I am named after Walter.
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Glenn Stephens

looking for my past Family members tree
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Buzz Stevens

Trying to determine where my Stephens Ancestor came from. My DNA results came in as R-ZP112. Would love to compare with anyone who tested the same.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Stephens name has a long history in British Isles, but now DNA and some recorded history says their origin is from the Emerald Island. The Stephens story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup B2] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Stephens surname origin is from Clan Domnaill [DNA Tribe R1b-L513, Subgroup B1] and relations who remain in Ireland take the modern surname (O’)Donnelly, McDonald and Donohue in Ireland.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) According to research, the Domnaill name is also found in Brittany, France. It is a very old name which appears in the 5th century Roman inscriptions as Dumnovellaunos in Brittany meaning “Deep Valour” equivalent to Irish Domhnaill. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Stephens story begins in pre-history Ireland then moves to Wales where the family can be traced back to their Welsh tribe Cydifor Fawr. An ancestor and many of his kin will then move to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
Reply
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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Kathleen Elliott

My husbands family, Elliott, came to Australia in the mid 1800s, they were not convicts, they emigrated to South Australia and have been here since, mostly still in South Australia, we live in NSW and his brother and sister still live in Victoria. I need to make sure I have the correct family tree I'm just not sure about everyone, as his parents are deceased I have no one to ask!!
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ELLIOTT

Descendants of my CHAMBERS kin who came to New York in 1851 from Ireland have the middle name ELLIOTT. There must have been a family connection. Any advice or information would be useful. Thank you. George J. Chambers Westminster, CA
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Sherri

My father's name (born in 1963) is Leon Elliott, his father's name is Joseph Elliott.
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David Leonard Kitterman

I am attempting trace my grand fathers lineage his name was Joseph Elliott born in 1905 to James and Susan Elliott in Ardara
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Diane O Wright

I belong to Ancestry.com and I have come a long ways in locating ancestors from my mother' side of the family which is Boyce and my grandmother's side which is Elliott. I still have a long ways to go but would appreciate any help along the way if anyone knows anything. I have discovered a couple of relatives born Ireland.
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Amy Hamilton

Hi, I’ve hit a brick wall with my Elliott’s in my tree, I’ve only found confirmed information to my 2nd Great grandparents. Any suggestions on search sites, surnames is greatly appreciated. My family comes from Scotland and Ireland and Britain, going further back I’m sure to other locations I’ve yet to discover.
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Elliott

As i am jeremy Matthew alan Elliott, mothers fathers side wilson, mothers mothers side grant and father's mother's side burns; what happened to the eliots and for a less better term. Is the name elliott a low class mutt name in hierarchy to the other names mentioned? I use mutt as in it's definition but as in it's multitudes of names it has absorbed
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Mary

Sendto my family tree
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 1 of 3) The Elliott name can be found in Scotland, but its origin according to DNA is from the north-west coast of the Emerald Island. The Elliott story [dominated by DNA tribal marker R1b-L513, Subgroup A1] can trace their origins to the Finn Valley in Donegal, Ireland from 50 BCE. Perhaps the journey begins with the Clanna Dedad; Deda, son of Sen or Deda Mac Sin. The Elliott surname origin is from a Northern Ui Neill [R1b-L513] tribe. The Cenél Eoghan and the tribes of Donegal conquered much of Ulster (Derry and Tyrone).
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 2 of 3) Cenél Eoghan will expand across northern Ireland with their cousins Cenél Conaill and the Northern Ui Neill between 500-800 BCE. The clans of Finn Valley have the same DNA as people from Gwynedd in Brittany. But how could this be? Recent discoveries from DNA testing are unlocking the migration patterns of Celtic tribes as late as 800 CE to 1200 CE. The Elliott story begins in pre-history Ireland then moves to Scotland as they form part of the Dalriada. Descendants of their tribe will then travel to Brittany, France during the Dark Ages.
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Anthony Barrett

(Part 3 of 3) Discover their newly found untold story and how forgotten texts bring their story back to life. From the ebook, “The Tribe Within” learn how DNA unfolds this amazing tale and if you look in the right places, how history narrates this evidence. There is another written account of their story, but it is camouflaged in smoke and myth – it will become the tales of King Arthur. Come follow in the footsteps of Deda Mac Sin and visit https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/401207
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Daniel

My grandma was a bishop and my grandfather was a moberly, have u ever heard of rather name
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Daniel moberly

Hello my grand mother was Rescue bishop Moberly
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Jessica Rye

I have a friend that while we were talking about family names, it came up that my Grandmother-was a Gilbert and bring a bit taken back she informed me that her mom was a Gilbert. Our family’s all came from around the same areas and... So, we took a 23 and me test only to find out we have no dna the same. Now we are intrigued as to how this is possible... on a mission to figure it out
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May

Arthur may that went down on the titanic 1012
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May

Family is from Newfoundland
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Alan Keith Parsons

Hi my name is Alan K. Parsons and my dad's name is Barry K Parsons and was one of 7 brothers from Tazewell County west Virginia and they were coal miners.
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Tricia Nations

Hi, I'm new at this, but was wondering about my Lang heritage in Ireland and Scotland. I don't have a lot of information, but my grandfather was Gordon Lang
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Hancock

Elizabeth Barr Hancock Great Grandmother estimate birthday 1860-death 1905 Lived in West Virginia married McIntrye
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Cynthia (Hodge) Graeff

My maiden name is Cynthia Hodge my Grandfather was John Hodge and my Dad was John Larry Hodge. My son and I are traveling to Ireland and England in March 2020. And are reaching out on more history of the Hodge and if there are any family members or places to go to learn more while we are in Ireland and England. Regards
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Brandy Marie Warren

When Mary Abbie Hooper married Henry Whalen in 1889, my family name changed. I have traced my genealogy back to Joshua Thomas Hooper born 4-7-1703 and died in October 1763. He was born in Kittery point, York Maine. I am unable to go further back as I cannot find his parents names. I am interested to see what area we come from, and possibly find relatives with stories they maybe willing to share.
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Buddy Hooper

just part of the Tribe trying to learn more about family history.
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Pat Favier

I am not a Hooper, but I have a book titled 'Dublin Castle and the Irish People' [R. Barry O'Brien] with the inscription, 'P.J. Hooper with the authors kind regards, 2 April 1912'.You are welcome to it if interested.
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Paul Hooper

Hi i would love to find out more about my ancestors.
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Robert Hugh Joslin - CPPA

I am the eldest member of the Maui, Family Joslin that came to Hawaii, USA in the early 1980s (40 years ago). I am the eldest son of Hugh Edward Joslin who was a long time NASA engineer. My brother Mark and I were born 1958 and 1960 in Rockledge, Florida which was the small town adjacent to the NASA's Cape Canaveral Launch facility. I am currently the National Treasurer for the National Association of Public Insurance Adjusters (NAPIA). Public Adjusters are hired by policyholders and attorneys needing assistance to fight against insurance carriers low-balling property losses.
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Laura Cann

Cann families.
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Jessie He

All look fantastic, look forward to visit Plymouth soon.
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